Artist/Designer Spotlight: Porter Teleo

I am wildly obsessed with the design duo of Porter Teleo – artist Kelly Porter and designer Bridgett Cochran. They have combined their enormous talent to develop a unique, hand-printed and hand-painted line of fabric and wallcoverings. Their work has been featured in many publications from, House Beautiful, Luxe, Veranda, Elle Decor and many more.

After I discovered Porter Teleo (and fell madly in love), I just had to speak with these ladies about their work, lifestyle, and inspirations.

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AW: How did Porter Teleo become who it is today?

BC: One small step at a time. It is wild to look back and see how far we have come.   I think Kelly and I shared a vision, an amazingly optimistic outlook, and a strong work ethic that all helped fuel our growth. 

KP: Bridgett Cochran and I had a wild idea to bring the best of both worlds together – fine art from my background and interior design from her background.  We brainstormed ideas over dinner and a bottle of wine.  6 months later, due to a lot of hard work and some unique and fresh designs, we had a line!  We worked together to create the beginnings of the collection, we started tiny, and then built it up over time.

AW: Who are a few artists/designers you admire and why?

BC: I absolutely love Miles Redd’s work – every time I see a space that he has created I can tell it is him, not because the rooms are the same, but because they have such depth and character.   I am a big fan of Celerie Kemble as well, she always gives an unexpected twist that still feels completely  livable and I have never seen a room designed by Jeffrey Bilhuber that I wouldn’t want to live in.  As for artists – I also love Cy Twombly and am drawn to Helen Frankenthaler’s paintings, especially her palettes.

KP: I love Cecily Brown, Francesco Clemente, Cy Twombly, and all of the abstract expressionists from the 50’s.  Design-wise – I love Kelly Behun’s style, Nicole Fuller, Jackson Paige, and Miles Redd.  It’s hard to name those, because there are so many more!

AW: What are some of the things that influence your work?

BC: Color, natural order, contrasting values, and balance.  

KP: Nature, organic form, botanical life, naturally created pattern, geology, Ancient art, religious art.

AW: What is a typical day behind the scenes at Porter Teleo? 

BC: The best thing about the career that we have created for ourselves is that there is no typical day!  There is absolutely no opportunity to get bored here!  We might be working on a new collection for two days and quickly need to switch to digging in on a new marketing plan and then back to the studio to mix color and finalize new colorways for new collections. It is exciting and fulfilling and provides endless opportunities for learning new ideas and processes.   

KP: We do a bit of everything!  It is always exciting – mainly because we are privy to information about the most exciting interior design going on in the world.  Our clients are top notch, so we see everything in the works, as we are creating patterns, product and color schemes for these amazing projects by the best designers in the world.  That is what I love about our days – that there is always inspirational info around us.

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AW: What are your everyday essentials?

BC: The essentials change based on what we are concentrating on in the studio.   The one thing that is always essential is our team!  They are smart, creative, adaptable, interesting people. 

KP: Paint, Ink, brushes, elevations, and a good creative team that is positive and ready to go!

AW: A typical day in your life includes…?

BC: Many hats! I feel so lucky to have a work life that allows me to enjoy my home life and my children as much as I do.   Kelly and I knew early on, and before we became mothers, that we both wanted to create a life that allowed us to express ourselves in our work while still leaving energy to feel alive in our personal lives.    

KP: I keep really busy – I have two young daughters who mean everything to me, then I work hard at Porter Teleo, then when I get home and on weekends, I work a lot on my own paintings – oil on canvas.

 

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Window Treatments: Porter Teleo

Interiors: Boone Interiors

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Wallpaper (ceiling): Porter Teleo

Interiors: Elizabeth Krueger Design

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Wallpaper: Porter Teleo

Interiors: Olga Malyeva / Architectural Digest

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Window Treatments: Porter Teleo (jaw drop!)

Interior: Angie Hranowsky / House Beautiful

Follow Porter Teleo on Instagram to stay inspired!

xoA

 

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Design Inspiration with Marie Flanigan

As a designer, I am always on the look out for my next source of inspiration and it can come from so many different places as well as in many different forms – a printed fabric on a blouse in a store front window, brushstroke colors on a piece of art, texture on a piece of pottery found at an estate sale, or simply through the work of others. Much of my inspiration comes while admiring the work of some of my most admired designers and artists, we all have our own unique style when it comes to designing, but that doesn’t mean we can’t be influenced by the creative works of others.

Today I’d like to spend a moment appreciating one of my sources of inspiration – Marie Flanigan. She is an extremely talented designer, I see her work as natural elegance and always so full of light.

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(All images courtesy of Marie Flanigan Interiors)

Upon “entering” any one of these rooms, you can’t deny the serene and calming vibe bouncing back at you. Neutral tones set off by flashes of gold, natural textures, tailored lines, all come together to create “refined elegance and innovative simplicity.”

An Andrea curation, with a little Marie flare, to get your juices flowing this fine Friday morning! Enjoy and remember, inspiration is around every corner!

 

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 1. Ikat Throw Pillow by Lillian August / 2. Brass Geometric Lamp by Currey & Co.  / 3. Espresso Velvet Sofa by Lillian August / 4. Orb Sculpture by Lillian August / 5. Free Form Platters by John Richard / 6. Geometric Print Throw Pillow from One Kings Lane / 7. Decorative Succulents by John Richard / 8. Exposed Wood Accent Chair by Hickory White / 9. Faux Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree from Houzz / 10. Petrified Wood Side Table by Aire Furniture / 11. Driftwood Mirror from One Kings Lane

Artist/Designer Spotlight: William McLure

This month’s spotlight goes to the ever so talented personality, William McLure. He is checking all inspiring boxes when it comes to an Artist and Designer – rich, natural and authentic are 3 words that come to mind when admiring his portfolio. He is a true Southern design gem and I am sure you are going to love our little Q&A with William.

AW: What kind of creative process, routines or rituals do you have?



WM: Well, first off I typically prefer to paint in the early morning hours or late at night. I typically get interrupted less during these hours and once the creative process is interrupted it can be hard to jump back into your creative cycle. I’m always listening to music or podcasts while I paint. I find that it keeps my mind from wandering and helps keep me focused, in some weird way, lol.



AW: What is integral to the work of an artist?


WM: For me I think it would have to be your space. I found very early on that this work requires large spaces to spread everything out and allow for drying time for the artwork. You also need a lot of natural light. My loft is perfect for this because two sides of the loft are nothing but floor-to-ceiling windows.

AW: Tips or advice you would give to someone trying to pursue a career in art and design?

WM: 
This is actually a great question. For me, I believe these two skill sets are talent-based. So, if you don’t have some sort of knack for it I don’t think it can be successfully cultivated through the educational process.
For me, one of them most important assets was being able to work for and with people that are talented. This experience taught me so much more than an education ever could. Also, never be afraid to take a risk. Sometimes it can be one of the most rewarding things you’ve ever done. I’m living proof of that, lol!



AW: Do you ever experience creative blocks? How do you overcome them?


Most definitely! Recently I have had my best friend, my dog Baylor, pass away after 15-1/2 years, so, I really didn’t work or touch any painting for about four weeks. It was extremely hard for me, but eventually I started exploring social media again, looking at design books, and reading articles that were design based. Integrating myself back into my work through these avenues, was a great way to overcome my emotional block and to re-cultivate my creativity and get my mind back into the game.




AW: Who are a few artists/designers you admire and why?


WM: Mark Sikes is pretty amazing! He has the whole lifestyle concept down pat!
I think as far as the artist go I would have to go with Catherine and Jones. She’s based in Birmingham and has a clean, honest and timelessness quality to her work. Her composition and colors are on-point. I’ve actually spoken to her about commissioning a piece of hers for myself.


AW: What are your everyday essentials?

WM: 
I would have to say a long sleeve blue button down, some torn blue jeans, a great pair of sunglasses and some well-made loafers.




AW: A typical day in your life includes…?

WM: My morning drive to Starbucks and trying to get all my errands run before lunch. Then home to work on commissions… and at night time you can pretty much bet your bottom dollar I’m in the bathtub with Netflix.

AW: When do you feel most inspired?


WM: Usually it’s at night. I tend to be a little ADHD and there are less distractions at night, so I can really get in the creative flow and not be interrupted.

AW: Your latest obsession?

WM: My latest obsession….. I think it would have to be this 9-foot long by 6-foot tall, 17th century tapestry that I had framed to go over my bed.
I had been eyeballing it for about a year at the frame shop where I have some items framed. So, one day when I was there getting something framed I just happened to ask him what the story was behind it and why it was still there. He said that a doctor had brought it in to have it restored and framed, but had never come back to claim it and pay for it. I asked if it could be for sale and he said yes…… at that moment I instantly turned on the charm! He said all I had to do was pay the doctor’s bill and I could purchase it!
Needless to say, I pulled my debit card out instantly! And “that’s all she wrote,” and it became mine.


AW: What do you do when you are outside of your studio?


WM: Well, I enjoy running so that releases a lot of stress it helps me level out. I have a pretty close- knit group of friends, so we are usually at one of our houses doing a dinner party and cocktails.

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Are you in love yet? I’d love to hear what you think about my Q&A will William!

xo A

Artist/Designer Spotlight: Zoe Pawlak

Welcome to Wachs This Ways’ new feature, Artist/Designer Spotlight. There are so many wonderful and talented humans out there and I believe they need a shout out, so I’m here to do just that.

After some serious creative soul surfing on the web recently I discovered Canadian artist, Zoe Pawlak. Her contemporary artwork is so refreshing and moody – in all of the right ways. She makes contemporary take on such a diversity – figurative, floral and landscapes – each with its own flair of personality. From canvas to floor, I love it all! Yup, you heard me correctly, floor – her rug collection is a show stopper!

Top of my list, if I must choose one, Rising

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I couldn’t stand to not share both of these beauties! Oh! The floors I can envision them on.

Over Oceans Collection-Coastal Shift

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Red Dust Collection-Shift

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If you’re still stuck on the commitment process when it comes to purchasing art, head back to my Designers Tips post ‘Andrea’s Tricks to Selecting Art‘.

xoA

Walking into the weekend like…

 

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Megan Hess / London Fashion Week 3 Print

Feeling fantastic going into this weekend. Confidence through the roof! It was such  a great week, there are few things better than feeling like you’ve earned some time off. When you’ve worked your booty off all week and you are left with a great sense of accomplishment by the end of day on Friday… that’s when you know you’ve earned it. So, clock out and get to doing some you time.

And, let me not forget to share my latest love – Megan Hess‘s fashion forward illustrations. Her designs are so playful, yet glamorous at the same time. Add some confidence to your office space or dressing room vanity with one of her prints.

 

New York-Lost in Dior & New York-Sipping in Celine

xo A

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Designer Tips: Andrea’s Tricks to Selecting Art

Art is the perfect outlet to express your personality in your home, furniture and accessories are part of your home decor story telling, but art is an expression of you. There is a reason one piece stands out to you more than another – so, what do you do once that to die for piece speaks to you? Buy it on the spot and hang it wherever you can as soon as you walk through your front door? Well, Mr or Ms go getter, it may not be quite so easy. When you are going to make an investment in a work of art (no pun intended), you may want to consider a few things before you commit. I would like to share a few tips and tricks with you so when you unexpectedly fall in love with a beautiful painting on your way to the grocery store, you will have been prepared for that moment.

 

1.  Scale. Envision where that piece will go, is it the right size for the space? As a general rule, you don’t want artwork to overpower the piece of furniture it is hanging above and you certainly do not want it to be too small. If you have a large empty wall don’t be shy to use the whole space for one piece, and on the other hand, if you do not have a large piece to fill that space, then consider a grouping of small pieces.

 

MILIEU Magazine / Interior Design: Richard Hallberg / Photography: Max Kimm-Bee

 

2. No rule. There is no rule of thumb that art should blend in with its’ surroundings, but you may hear the advice that your artwork should balance your interior and remain consistent. Once again, there is no rule of thumb! In fact, I’m going to let Canadian artist, Zoe Pawlak‘s words talk us through number 2.

“While your home decor can obey certain rules, such as investing in neutral couches or flooring, I urge people to use their walls for irrational or eclectic choices. Art is a place for expression through color content, and texture. Choose art at a heart level…”

 

Alfonso Marina (foot note: THAT CABINET!)

 

3. Compliments. Number three is a carry-over from number two. There is no rule that art should match your furniture, however, consider complimenting. Pick a color or two from your piece of art and coordinate that color with an element in your room – whether it is an accent chair or throw pillow. Let your artwork have one or two things in common with the room, this, in fact, will increase your art’s statement in the space that it is hung.

 

Laura U Interior Design

 

4. Framing. Not all art should be framed but when you have a piece that requires a frame, take a moment to consider your choice. Does your selection compliment the furniture or features of your room? Choose a frame to match your flooring, or on a more subtle level, if you have a pair of silver lamps consider a silver frame. Even if you are choosing a frame to add contrast to the style of your room, like a contemporary piece to a traditional room, just like we said in Number Three, a little compliment will effortlessly tie it together.

 

Laura U Interior Design

5. Hanging. Position your artwork at eye level. If your room has high ceilings you may be tempted to hang the piece higher, but consider an art gallery’s standard – the center of your artwork should be about 60 inches from the floor. If you are hanging a grouping or collection, to find the center, treat them as if they were one piece.

 

Holly Hunt

 

 How would you hang you art? Comment below, I would love to share your ideas!

xo A

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